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How to Make Natural Green Food Coloring

Saint Patrick’s Day is coming up quickly and with it will be a ton of reasons to need green colored foods.  I am not a big fan of artificial colors but it seem somehow wrong of me to deny my children green frosted cupcakes and cookies during our celebrations of all things Irish.  I decided to try playing around with ways to make natural green food coloring so my kids can enjoy their green desserts.  Of course, the first thing I do is head to the internet to do some research.  I come across a couple of ideas that sound plausible.  One says to juice kale or spinach and use the juice to die your frosting.  Well, I do have a juice but did not think it could handle greenery so I started with method number two which was WAY more complicated!  I will just tell you right now that I made the wrong choice!  Here is a brief rundown of my attempts to make natural green food coloring:

 

The Boiling Method:

Summary:  Long, involved, smells up the entire house and does NOT result in green colored frosting!

making natural green food coloring

Basically, puree an entire head of kale with 4 to 5 cups water and then spend several hours simmering it on the stove to concentrate it.  After extensive filtering and chilling and yet MORE filtering, I ended up with something rather nasty looking.  Not only does it smell bad it also did NOT turn my frosting green, no matter how much of that darn stuff I put in there!

natural frosting collage

The Juicing Method:

Summary:  Incredibly easy, you need only a few handfuls of greenery to get enough juice to dye your frosting and there is NO bad stink in my house.  Honestly, my husband wanted to open windows in January after having boiled kale for 3 hours in my kitchen!  Now, the drawback to this method is that you have to have a pretty decent juicer.  I have a stainless steel one and it complained a bit if my handfuls of leafy greens were too big.  However, I recommend everyone get a good juice anyhow because fresh juices are extremely healthy and really tasty as well!

Instructions:  Simple!  Just assemble the juicer, put in the greenery and turn on!  I used a combination of kale and baby spinach.  Now, I was a little bit worried at first because you don’t get a lot of juice out of greens:

making natural green food coloring

I probably used about a total of 3 to 4 cups of packed greens and had plenty to die my batch of frosting.  If you want to make your frosting homemade (very easy and you skip all that artificial junk!)  Here is what you do:

1 (8 ounce) package of cream cheese, softened

1 stick of butter, softened

 1/2 cup powdered sugar

Natural green food coloring as described above.

natural green food coloring for cookies

Sugar Cookies with Natural Green Food Coloring

 

Now, a couple of quick notes about this frosting:  If you eat it by itself you can taste a little bit of a difference when compared to plain frosting.  It isn’t as obvious if you are actually eating it on a cookie.  Also, the kale juice thins out the frosting.  If you need to thicken it more, just add extra powdered sugar.  Also, because this is a NATURAL green food coloring,  I am not sure how long it will stay the color in the photo!  Mine has been sitting several hours and is still fine but if you are worried, add the kale juice right before you need to frost and serve.

So, now you can skip the little tiny tubes and use natural green food coloring for your Saint Patrick’s Day celebrations.  If you don’t want to go through the trouble of making your own, you can actually buy India Tree Natural Decorating Colours instead.

Have any suggestions for other colors I can make with natural products?

 

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About Diane

Diane has a Bachelor’s degree in Microbiology with a Minor in Health Management and Policy. She spent many years working in cancer research, academics, and biotechnology. Concern over the growing incidence of human disease and the birth of her children led her to begin living a more natural life. She quickly realized that the information she was learning along the way could be beneficial to many others and started blogging as a way to share this knowledge with others. While passionate about health and the environment she can't quite give up her favorite Cheetos and Diet Coke!

Comments

  1. This looks like a green food my daughter would actually eat! I must make this thanks :)

  2. Oh, thank you for this tip! I also hate the artificial coloring that is used all the time!

  3. Thanks for this! We always try to dye easter eggs with natural dye, and have never gotten an acceptable green. Yes, I tried the boil the greens method with both kale and spinach and neither one worked. I will try juice this year.

  4. What a great idea! I just can’t let my oldest daughter catch me doing it. I make smoothies using spinach juice for an added healthy boost and she won’t touch them! All of my other kids will gladly suck them down… except her! I will have to try this when she is not around to be sure I can slide it past her!

  5. Wow, that’s a lot of work! I just buy mint flavored chlorophyll at the health food store and call it a day :)

    • I have never heard of such a thing! I will see if I can find some at the health food store next time I am there. The juicing was easy but the first method I tried was a LOT of work!

  6. My husband would have been the same way with the windows after three hours of kale boiling. I think the second method is the way to go and would interest my kids too.

  7. Such an informative post! Love this.

  8. This is definitely cool. I don’t like the idea of using artificial coloring but I do love the colors!

  9. Wow, what a cool idea! Thanks for sharing at Artsy Corner :)

  10. Brilliant! We’ve gotta try this, thanks!

  11. We were making soap yesterday, and the question of a green natural dye came up– some suggestions in our group were liquid chlorophyll or spirulina (powder).

    • thanks for sharing. I need to see if my local health food store has either of these. It would be an easy solution for green foods!

Trackbacks

  1. […] and boiling kale to dye things with and it just doesn’t work.  See last year’s post on how to dye frosting green naturally.  That was quite an experiment!  I topped the shamrock milkshake with homemade whipped cream made […]

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